About your Search

20130115
20130123
STATION
CNN 4
CNNW 4
KQED (PBS) 4
KRCB (PBS) 4
KTVU (FOX) 3
WETA 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
FBC 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WTTG 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 40
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
this morning. franklin roosevelt did that because george washington had done it. i mean there's just something wonderful about that. he got out of the car and walked and so did mrs. obama. why? because jimmy carter did it in 1977. every president since has done it. i mean, >> a great strength to him. he might be more liberal than most people politically. in his personal demeanor, in his family life and in his style he's a very traditional person. that came across. that helps people relate to him. >> ifill: mark said he talked to a democrat who said he thought he did pretty well. did you talk to any republicans? >> i think they thought it was a good speech. people said this was one of his best speeches. some of them thought it was defensive, about defending the welfare state more than being offensive. i think the sentence that really got some republicans more upset was where he said we don't have to choose between protecting the programs for the elderly and securing programs for the young. i would say most republicans say, well, actually we do have a choose. if you keep the current benefit leve
? >> second terms have been tough. even for franklin roosevelt. he started off his second term with his first political loss. here is why second terms are tough. number 1 many presidents often put out their best ideas in their first term. they don't even know necessarily if they are going to get a second crack. secondly, washington can be brutal. you are a little bit battered after a first term. and finally you have been in the washington bubble much too long and you do and everyone is calling you mr. president, and you have all of these handlers, and pollsters and hucksters who always bring you down to the lowest common denominator. my first advice to barack obama, take all of those pollsters and hucksters and second them to a island far, far away for the next four years. >> michael: listening to what you just said and coming off of that, president obama a lot of people think he has been in his own bubble. does that make him unusual? >> it does make him a little bit unusual. and i think maybe there's a chance here. look, if you want to be a great president, you have to ove
, in 1905, was the first president to draw massive crowds. but, in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war two was raging. historian douglas brinkley. >> "but that was a very unique year, 1945, and most normal situations, even if we're in a recession or we're in a foreign war we still throw pretty big inaugurals." >> reporter: for maurice madden. it is mainly a big moment. >> "i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i'll be able to look back on all of this and say, you know, that i was part of american history and that really means a lot to me." >> reporter: a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, c-n-n, washington. >> hundreds of thousands of people will be able to witness the event. but they won't be able to share the event as easily as they would hope. >> it looks like it is going to be a bit more mild than it was four years ago. partly to mostly cloudy skies with a few late shower possibilities. clear skies and relatively mild. 50s. has to go through tonight and after midnight temperatures will be dropping into the 30's. 20's. th
historian, he will have taken four oaths, puts him at the same league at fdr. >> that is right. franklin roosevelt took the oath four times and bit of a fluke for a president who is limited to two terms to take it four times. that is what happens when you have it last time and repeat it and, of course, we had january 20th fall on sunday which is private ceremony today. >> eric: you have written about the resolution and founding fathers. what do you think they would say if they came back and turn the tv and watched what is going to happen tomorrow? >> i think they would be thrilled that so many american people can watch the peaceful transfer of power under the u.s. constitution. that is really what an inauguration is all about. >> eric: george washington wore ra brown suited and white silk stockings, and he had a sword. can you imagine if the president came out with a sword? and it was the same sense of history and love of our country that has continued through all these years? >> yes, the love of country and patriotism, things are different but obviously washington's first inaugural was
of 2007. that tops the performance of president obama's four predecessors. franklin roosevelt tops that business. >>> businesses in new orleans have spent months to celebrate the fans celebrating the super bowl. the big game always provides a huge economic boost to the host city. not everyone who comes as a ticket. now, new orleans attracts a lot of people, expecting 150,000 fans this year. >> as we've been telling you all morning, the san francisco 49ers will be a big part of that party. it will be the sixth super bowl appearance for the 49ers' franchise. janine de la vega is live right now right at the 49ers' team store. we know it will be busy and you have your hands around all of that prized merchandise. >> reporter: the store does not open for a couple of more hours. you can they already have all of this nfc championship gear in the window. of course you, right underneath it, you can see it has the -- of course, right underneath it, you can see it has the member -- memorabilia. the 49ers had a rough first half and was down by 17 points but frank gore scored two touchdowns in t
country, or franklin roosevelt, we have nothing to fear but fear itself. or abraham lincoln, with malice towards none in the civil war. it's almost as much the moment, the point we are in history and a president who rises to that moment, unites americans, touches the common spirit, as it is the skill of all my friends who are speech writers coming up with those memorable words. >> arthel: if it's that idea of touching our collective soul and make the best of the moment, as you would say is the best use of an inaugural speech, what do you think the american people want to hear in president obama's second inaugural speech on monday? >> you know, if you think back four years ago, the country was full of hope. it was a real celebration. it was an historic moment. we were maturitying our first african-american president. there was a sense that they were on the verge of a great time of hope. things are definitely different now. we've got a divided country. it's a less historic moment. we got a lot of folks still looking for jobs and can't find them. we've got partisan politics and a paralyzed
was the first president to draw massive crowds. but in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war ii was raging. historian douglas brinkley. >> that was a unique year, and most situations, even if we're in a recession or foreign war, we still throw pretty big inaugurals. >> reporter: for maurice madden, it is mainly a big moment. >> i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i'll be able to look back on all of this and say i know that i was, you know, a part of american history. and that really means a lot to me. >> reporter: a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, american journey. tom foreman, cnn, washington try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but it's not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but
. in a few hours. >> chris: franklin roosevelt started the custom and st. john's, across lafayette square from the white house has been linked to presidents almost two centuries. >> it has a special place, because as everyone says, location, location, location... >> chris: who was the first president to worship here. >> james madison, the first president when the church was finished in 1816. >> chris: how many presidents have worshipped here, since then. >> every one. >> chris: during the civil war lincoln worshipped at st. john's on sunday evenings. >> president lincoln would come after the service had started, sit in the very back pew of the church. >> chris: back there. >> in the very back of the church and he didn't want to deserve the congregation while they were worshipping, so he came late and left early. >> chris: but madison sat in the middle of the church in pew 54. and that has become the president's pew. >> when word gets out that the president is coming to worship you almost feel like the church will tilt over on one side because so many people are on that one side. >> chris:
times since what president? >> franklin roosevelt. >> all right. wins the prize? >> let me give you this. how about this? he is the first president, first democratic president since franklin roosevelt to be elected with more than 50% twice. he is also the first president since dwight eisenhower to be elected twice with more than 51%. >> there you go? >> ranken was above. a mandate. >> a second term. will we see any difference in his second term? what's the second term going to look like? i know you are talking about that with some folks in columbia? >> i will be up at the university of district of columbia with a great event organized by progressive democrats of america, national nurses united, communication workers, a lot of unions bringing together all sorts of folks. keith ellison will be there as well as a lot of other folks talking about this. i think obama can be different. the question is: will he? >> he was showing good signs? >> the transition has been one of the better trigs in modern history. he took on the whole fiscal cliff thing and was strong
. >> reporter: franklin delano roosevelt lifted people's spirits too. he used the first of his four inaugural addresses to start the healing of a nation badly broken from the great depression. >> the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> reporter: more than a generation later when nearly 2 million people crowded onto the national mall to see the swearing in of the first african-american president, it was a moment of national unity. but as this historian notes when the president gives his second inaugural address, the magic for the most part is lost. >> they are not as impressive not as compelling as first inaugural spices. >> don baer who was a speech righter for clinton says the most recent speeches whether by eisenhower, fdr, reagan clinton, or george w. bush don't soar to the same heights as they're measured against the reality of the first four years. >> well the first inaugural is sort of like a new baby right? there's so much expectation and potential. the second is like an adolescent, a teenager. we know it didn't quite turn out exactly the way we hoped.
about a president who used all kinds of executive authority. look at teddy roosevelt or franklin roosevelt. that's what presidents do. you know what that's called? it's called leadership. we want people who will lead in times of crisis. not who are afraid of their own shadows. phillip down in gainesville florida. >> caller: hi, i wanted to say i completely totally agree about what you were saying about gun control hasn't gone far enough and that you know, i think we should go in the direction of britain and australia. >> bill: i agree. >> caller: i also think the time is a little too late, you know. when obama first ran for president on hope and change, i was ecstatic to get obama in there and i was just like all of these changes are going to happen. and i was so completely disappointed when we had a democratic president and a democratic majority in the house and nancy pelosi as speaker of the house and the time to have done something on gun control would have been then. but the first words that really made me think that something's wrong here is when nancy pelosi got up and spea
on their heels. overreach is a common risk of presidents in their second term. classic example is franklin roosevelt wins the election, tries to change the supreme court. it all comes tumbling down. the president has to be conscious of that. divide republicans between those who believe the party has to try to rebuild itself, rebuild the national majority and those that are locked into a staunchly conservative view? >> even with the supreme court's decision, would you expect that it will still play a large role in the second term? >> it's absolutely critical for him to be able to make this work. his re-election means republicans in congress will not be able to repeal it. >> and next year is when we really start to feel the impact. >> absolutely. he is still in hand-to-hand combat with governors in particular in implementing it. a number of republican governors have refused to set up what's required, and the public component of expansion of coverage. there's lots of challenges of moving 30 million more people into an insurance-based system. so that could mean enormous implementation challeng
is not true. i reminded him franklin roosevelt's term. they did not dwell on it, but come up with that was the time of sluggish growth when the government was tilting toward private sector unions. at a time when you had a significant recession and weak government, heavy regulations, higher taxes, what got us out of that economic doldrums is something called world war ii. we are in the economic doldrums again, very sluggish growth that has not been president in america since that time. we don't want a world war ii in our hands and none seems to be on offer. i am not sure how we get out of this. the younger generation of americans, the majority of whom support president obama although a reduced majority, will have to make do with less at least for the time being. tracy: happily they will be a little disheartened by their votes. thank you for sharing your thoughts with us. >> thank you. ashley: well, in his inauguration address, president obama said the economic recovery has begun, but how far have we exactly come in the past four years? lauren simonetti is taking a look at the
to draw massive crowds. but in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war ii was raging. the story by douglas brinkley. >> that was an unusual year in 1945. most situations, even in a recession or we're in a foreign war, we still throw pretty big inaugurals. >> reporter: for maurice madden, it is mainly a big moment. >> i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i will be able to look back on all of this and say i know that i was a part of american history. and that really means a lot to me. >> reporter: a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, cnn, washington. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but it's not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like
franklin d. roosevelt to take the oath of office four times. in 2009, he took the oath twice because, in a do-over, performed the day after chief justice john roberts tripped on his lines during the first inauguration. >> within a few days, the president will be walking from that part of the capitol right here, and then down these stairs. >> suarez: new york democratic senator chuck schumer is chairman of the joint congressional committee on inaugural ceremonies, which oversees all of the inaugural rituals related to the capitol. >> there's no tanks in the streets, there's no rioting or picketing or protesting. it's a beautiful thing about america that the inauguration reminds us of. with all the trouble we have, the inauguration symbolizes that the republic marches onward. >> suarez: the president's inauguration will begin, as it did four years ago, with a national day of service tomorrow where people will be encouraged to pledge a year's effort to community organizations. at the inauguration itself, there are a few firsts. >> 150 years after the emancipation proclamation was signed
anyone any. only franklin roosevelt has been sworn in four times before in the united states history. and roosevelt is elected. and inspect the future. >> you saw the live picture. we saw the president with his wife. his two children and supreme court justice john roberts. the one who is officiate fog. this is a private inauguration. and the official much larger one is happening tomorrow. tori campbell is outside and covering both of those for us. it is only the seventh tomb in history that a president has to do the private swearing in ceremony because the constitution requires they be sworn in before noon. and it happened efficiently. it has to happen by noon. as he is now inaugurated and the official one will start tomorrow. >> we look at the exterior shot from the white house. you must think. and will he bring up of popular issues and we have the state of union coming up naylor february 12th. will he steer and quite difficult visive right now out of the christmas break and what was going on in congress. and we will see. what the president has to say tomorrow. it will be interestin
. some of those things preceded the second term as well. it always hasn't been the case. franklin d. roosevelt we just saw 1933 his second term although he had one big setback. he tried to go too far with the supreme court, it was still a successful second term. >> david, thank you so much. good to see you again. >> always a pleasure. >> you're watching "cbs this morning." >>> tomorrow on "cbs this morning saturday," a preview of the inauguration's events from our location. look at that. as they lead another day of national service to honor the reverend martin luther king jr., we'll ask the 3iii what he thinks of it. >> we've had an incredible week starting with oprah winfrey and lance armstrong. as we leave you, we take a look back at the week that was. have a great weekend. >> look that charlie rose move. >> from when? >> oh the other day. >> what's on your bucket list? >> i want to learn how to speak spanish. >> how about that flu shot? anyway moving right along -- >> don't you have something to do. >> gayle, i'm right with you. i haven't gotten mine yet.
. it hasn't always been the case. franklin d. roosevelt, we just saw in 1933. he had one major setback. he tried to go too far with the supreme court. >> thank you so much. >> always my pleasure. >> you're watching "cbs this morning." >>> tomorrow on "cbs this morning saturday," a preview of the inauguration's events from our location. look at that. as they lead another day of national service to honor the reverend martin luther king jr., we'll ask the iii what he thinks of it. >> we've had an incredible week starting with oprah winfrey and lance armstrong. as we leave you, we take a look back at the week that was. have a great weekend. >> look that charlie rose move. >> from when? >> oh, the other day. >> what's on your bucket list? >> i want to learn how to speak spanish. >> how about that flu shot? anyway, moving right along -- >> don't you have something to do. >> gayle, i'm right with you. i haven't gotten mine yet. >> why didn't you get your flu shot. >> because there's that old wive's tale of if you get the flu shot, you get the flu. >> much better than having the flu. >> it's hard
. maybe roosevelt and hoover an example of that. franklin roosevelt had been elected by a landslide in 1932 over president hoover who was considered to be responsible for the great depression and roosevelt was a great schmoozer. finally, they reduced to looking at the super structure of thing it was the commerce department that was being built and roosevelt said, lovely steel. that was sort of the end of the conversation. the rest of the ride they went in silence. this happens much too often, but not on a second term. >> and david gregory, about a two-mile drive. >> and you remember in the modern era, george w. bush -- the language plate is -- >> yeah, the license plate just for a second here is a story. it's a -- kind of a protest legal local license plate here in washington, d.c. taxation without representation. the president has opted to use them on all the limousines. >> and that always comes up for presidents. >> d.c. has a delegate, a nonvoting member of congress. >> george w. bush met president clinton and they got along famously. they were swapping stories and how bush raise
, not tyranny, a president, not a king. and the first step of the president, the oath of office. >> i franklin, del nor roosevelt, do somlely swear i. i george walker bush. >> do solemnly swear. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear. >> it's been taken over each president, usually over a bible with the eyes of the world watching. >> the office is the honor and the responsibility that is bestowed upon one individual to protect the united states, to protect the citizens of the united states, to honor the ideals of the constitution. >> george washington first added so help me god to the oath, a tradition president obammal continue as he takes that pledge once more on abraham lincoln's bible. our first president made a 250 mile journey on horseback and the nation celebrated a new dawn. >> this was the passing of power to a man who could have been king, but refused it. and then each successive inauguration was a celebration, even to today, to obama's inauguration, it's a celebration of that fact that twee didn't make our chief executive king. he wouldn't be a kick. he would pass it on. >> we
with the first one you have noted for us, involves franklin delano roosevelt. >> let's listen. >> my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into-- >> and that's interesting, because there was 1933 at the depression was on everybody's mind and everybody was afraid, so, what does he talk about? fear. >> it's a great speech in the sense he didn't get into policy prescriptions, he wasn't going to say i'm going to do this or i'm going to do that. or i have a 20-point plan. he spent the whole speech talking about the fact we need to get a steely resolve and see it through and talked about fear and said that's the only thing to fear, it's not about the future, we're going to be fine. one of the classics. >> steve: meanwhile, let's take a look at john f. kennedy's inaugural back in the '60s. >> our country and all who serve it, and the globe from that-- and truly like the world and so, my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. and
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)